52TEDs

Aug 12

View the video that inspires the upcoming poster response for the week of 08-13-2012. This talk shows how even with the smallest items, major impact can happen. After viewing the video, I want you to consider how you would visually depict this talk. Should it be more simple or complex?



Two-thirds of the world may not have access to the latest smartphone, but local electronic shops are adept at fixing older tech using low-cost parts. Vinay Venkatraman explains his work in “technology crafts,” through which a mobile phone, a lunchbox and a flashlight can become a digital projector for a village school, or an alarm clock and a mouse can be melded into a medical device for local triage.

Designer Vinay Venkatraman is committed to creating a digitally inclusive world. A founding partner at the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design, Vinay aims to design for the populations of the world who don’t have access to the latest tech gadget. He calls his outlook “Frugal Digital.” Vinay’s background is in industrial design, and he began his career fashioning bicycles and kitchen appliances. He was soon enticed by filmmaking and worked as visual effects designer for a leading post production house, Prime Focus Ltd, on various advertisements and movies. He later shifted his focus to software products, working as a product designer at Microsoft for emerging technologies. Vinay’s work has been written about in leading design magazines and popular blogs. He has also taught courses at Aarhus University, IUAV University in Venice and the IT University of Copenhagen. “Vinay Venkatraman, an interaction designer, is one of a rapidly expanding group of scholars and professionals around the world working to define the way our stuff behaves.” Julia Levitt, Worldchanging.com

Aug 8
Vinay Venkatraman // Designer: Speaker Profile for Upcoming Ted Talk Poster Response for the week of 8-13-2012
Aug 5

View the video that inspires the upcoming poster response for the week of 08-06-2012. This talk discusses the groundbreaking research that supported the hypothesis that a cancer cell’s microenvironment helps determine if a cell will become a tumor. How would you approach this heavy, scientific talk? How would you interpret it for others to understand?


For decades, researcher Mina Bissell pursued a revolutionary idea — that a cancer cell doesn’t automatically become a tumor, but rather, depends on surrounding cells (its microenvironment) for cues on how to develop. She shares the two key experiments that proved the prevailing wisdom about cancer growth was wrong.

Mina Bissell studies how cancer interacts with our bodies, searching for clues to how cancer’s microenvironment influences its growth. Mina Bissell’s groundbreaking research has proven that cancer is not only caused by cancer cells. It is caused by an interaction between cancer cells and the surrounding cellular micro-environment. In healthy bodies, normal tissue homeostasis and architecture inhibit the progression of cancers. But changes in the microenvironment—following an injury or a wound for instance—can shift the balance. This explains why many people harbor potentially malignant tumors in their bodies without knowing it and never develop cancer, and why tumors often develop when tissue is damaged or when the immune system is suppressed.

The converse can also be true. In a landmark 1997 experiment, mutated mammary cells, when dosed with an antibody and placed into a normal cellular micro-environment, behaved normally. This powerful insight from Bissell’s lab may lead to new ways of treating existing and preventing potential cancers.

"Bissell was not the first to claim that a cell’s microenvironment plays a role in the formation of tumors. But she showed how this happens…Still, she modestly maintains that her most important contribution is that she hammered away at her point for thirty years." Kara Platoni, East Bay Express

Aug 5
Mina Bissell // Researcher: Profile for Upcoming Ted Talk Poster Response for the week of 8-06-2012
Created July 30, 2012

Inspired by TEDTalk given by Baba Shiv, Professor at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business at TEDxStanford 2012.

View presentation below.This poster is not sponsored by TED or represents the views of TED. 
Jul 30

Created July 30, 2012

Inspired by TEDTalk given by Baba Shiv, Professor at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business at TEDxStanford 2012.

View presentation below.

This poster is not sponsored by TED or represents the views of TED. 

Jul 27

View the video that inspires the upcoming poster response on Monday. After viewing the video, I want you to consider how you would visually depict this talk. I have my ideas. What are yours? 


Over the years, research has shown a counterintuitive fact about human nature: That sometimes, having too much choice makes us less happy. This may even be true when it comes to medical treatment. Baba Shiv shares a fascinating study that measures why choice opens the door to doubt, and suggests that ceding control — especially on life-or-death decisions — may be the best thing for us.

Baba Shiv studies how “liking” and “wanting” shape the choices we make, and what that means in the world of marketing.

Does a bottle of wine’s price tag price affect the pleasure one experiences in buying and drinking it? Does getting immediate feedback on a choice lead a person to doubt their decision? Does being denied something make people pursue it more hotly while simultaneously liking it less? Over his academic career, Baba Shiv has researched these questions in neuroeconomics, winning awards like the William O’Dell prize for an article that made a significant, long-term contribution to marketing theory and practice. Two of Professor Shiv’s publications have received the Citation of Excellence from Emerald Management Reviews, and his research has been been featured on “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” and on NPR’s “Radiolab”, as well as in the Financial Times, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal.

A professor at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business, Shiv is the director of the Strategic Marketing Management Executive Program and teaches several popular MBA courses including “The Frinky Science of the Mind” and “Entrepreneurial Ventures in Luxury Markets”. He served as the editor of the Journal of Consumer Research and is also on the editorial boards of the Journal of Consumer Psychology, Journal of Retailing, Journal of Marketing and the Journal of Marketing Research. (www.ted.com)

Jul 25
Baba Shiv // Neuroeconomist: Speaker Profile for Upcoming Ted Talk Poster Response for the week of 7-30-2012
Created July 23, 2012

Inspired by TEDTalk given by TEDFellow Sanjana Hattotuwa, Founder of GROUNDVIEWS.org at TED2011.

View presentation below.This poster is not sponsored by TED or represents the views of TED. 
Jul 24

Created July 23, 2012


Inspired by TEDTalk given by TEDFellow Sanjana Hattotuwa, Founder of GROUNDVIEWS.org at TED2011.


View presentation below.

This poster is not sponsored by TED or represents the views of TED. 

Jul 24

TED2011 Fellow Sanjana Hattotuwa passionately describes his work with Groundviews — a citizen journalism website that sheds light on Sri Lankan narratives that aren’t typically covered in mainstream media.

Created July 16, 2012

Inspired by TEDTalk given by Jamie Drummond, Co-founder & President of ONE.org, at TEDGlobal 2012.View presentation below.This poster is not sponsored by TED or represents the views of TED.
Jul 24

Created July 16, 2012


Inspired by TEDTalk given by Jamie Drummond, Co-founder & President of ONE.org, at TEDGlobal 2012.

View presentation below.

This poster is not sponsored by TED or represents the views of TED.